taupe/beige/khaki
Posted: 03 October 2019 06:53 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Are not taupe, beige, and khaki virtually the same color? Each has varying shades within their spectrums. It would appear that one uses whichever they are more comfortable with.

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Posted: 03 October 2019 07:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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J. Crew and others in the clothing and decorating business might argue that they’re all very different.

It reminds me of an SNL skit from 2002 where Homeland Security announced the new “threat level” colors:  Off White, Cream, Putty, Bone, and Natural, along with confusing explanations of what each level meant.  the skit ends with the threat level being set to Taupe, which of course isn’t on the list.

https://snltranscripts.jt.org/01/01oridge.phtml

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Posted: 04 October 2019 04:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Yes. I’m sure they might, but I think it is more about sexy names rather than reality. I must add that I’m not against that.

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Posted: 04 October 2019 04:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I think tan covers all of them. It is the oldest of the group: taupe appeared in the mid 20th century; beige and khaki the mid 19th C; tan from 1590. I think the problem is that tan is just not cute enough for those who care.

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Posted: 04 October 2019 05:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Tan the color is a bit later, mid seventeenth century. It’s the color of tanned leather. Earlier cites are to the tanning process, not the color. Beige and taupe both come from French, imports from the fashion industry. Khaki is from the British army in India and is from Urdu. The “not cute enough” theory works for beige and taupe, but not for khaki, which has a different route into the language.

I’m not sure these have widely accepted definitions of difference. I suppose Pantone might set a standard, but I don’t know if they use these words or even how widely used the Pantone standards are. (Not my area of expertise, plus I have green-brown color blindness, so I’m not a good judge of subtle differences in browns.)

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Posted: 04 October 2019 05:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Pantone only names the basic colors. Otherwise, each shade is simply given a number (at least they were while I worded as an artist for close to 38 years). There are simply too many shades of colors to give names to all of them. Here is a chart that gives many shades of brown the name “tan”: http://simple.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tan

I found another reference to the first usage of tan as a color was 1590: “Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York: 1930 McGraw-Hill Page 205”. My main point is that tan is the older name. In other words, one would not be wrong to call Army Khakis tan.

True, Khaki entered on a different road, but I doubt few designers take that into account when determining what to call their product’s color. They all still qualify as a tan shade.

Edit: I don’t know why the link doesn’t work. Sorry. Try this one:
https://www.homedepot.com/b/Paint-Paint-Colors/Browns-Tans/N-5yc1vZcaw8Z1z13zm9

2nd Edit: Now it works.

[ Edited: 04 October 2019 10:30 AM by Eyehawk ]
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