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meme
Posted: 20 October 2019 06:35 PM   [ Ignore ]
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the word was coined “off-line” by Richard Dawkins before the internet in 1976. To rhyme with Gene. Probably the most explicit coinage of a new word:

From etymonline:quoting Dawkins

We need a name for the new replicator, a noun that conveys the idea of a unit of cultural transmission, or a unit of imitation. ‘Mimeme’ comes from a suitable Greek root, but I want a monosyllable that sounds a bit like ‘gene’. I hope my classicist friends will forgive me if I abbreviate mimeme to meme. If it is any consolation, it could alternatively be thought of as being related to ‘memory’, or to the French word même. It should be pronounced to rhyme with ‘cream’. [Richard Dawkins, “The Selfish Gene,” 1976]

Not on the big list as far as I can tell.

A Huffpost video sugggests, though light-hearted and fun at first, memes became used most negatively in the 2016 Election and continues into the ugly realm in 2020.

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Posted: 21 October 2019 04:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Funny, but the first time I saw this word on the internet, I thought it came from a name of something or somebody (like Auntie Meme, maybe) So, I checked it out and found it was used as a symbol of whatever the creator of that meme decides it should be. I had no idea it has been around for as long as it has been.

What I found: Meme is an abbreviated form of the Greek word “mimeme,” which means “something imitated.”

https://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/meme.

Edit: Ignore my repetition, please. I was tired when I posted exactly what Oecolampadius posted.

[ Edited: 22 October 2019 01:43 PM by Eyehawk ]
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Posted: 23 October 2019 05:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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To rhyme with Gene.

But it doesn’t ...

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Posted: 23 October 2019 04:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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OP Tipping - 23 October 2019 05:20 AM

To rhyme with Gene.

But it doesn’t ...

Yes, I should have said, “sounds a bit like …”

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Posted: 23 October 2019 10:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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OP Tipping - 23 October 2019 05:20 AM

To rhyme with Gene.

But it doesn’t ...

It does, according to Merriam Webster, \ ˈmēm \

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Posted: 24 October 2019 04:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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They also rhyme according to the Collins English Dictionary.

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Posted: 24 October 2019 07:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Do people not actually know what “rhyme” means?  Meme rhymes with beamGene rhymes with bean.  You can’t mix and match.

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Posted: 24 October 2019 08:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I guess I’m lost. “Rhyme” means to sound alike. They can be spelled differently. Are we talking about some other comparison?

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Posted: 24 October 2019 08:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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languagehat - 24 October 2019 07:50 AM

Do people not actually know what “rhyme” means?  Meme rhymes with beamGene rhymes with bean.  You can’t mix and match.

A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounds, a repeated pattern of sounds; therefore meme does rhyme with gene. Also, there are different types of rhymes: consonant rhyme, head rhyme, identical rhyme, etc.

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Posted: 24 October 2019 01:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Technically, meme and gene are examples of assonance, the repetition of vowel sounds, which is a form of rhyme. What LH is describing, and what most people mean when they casually use the term rhyme, is perfect rhyme.

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Posted: 24 October 2019 01:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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What most people mean when they casually use the term [I]rhyme, is perfect rhyme.

And not only then. I think it’s fair to say that except when people are overtly discussing different types of rhyme, such as head-rhymes, eye-rhymes et al, when they say rhyme they mean perfect rhyme, if only because they know that is how the word is generally understood. Everybody knows that unless in such a specialist context, the assertion ‘The words tough, trough, though and through all rhyme’ would be considered nonsensical.

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Posted: 24 October 2019 04:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Eyehawk - 24 October 2019 08:18 AM

I guess I’m lost. “Rhyme” means to sound alike. They can be spelled differently. Are we talking about some other comparison?

We are talking about “rhyme” as used by non-specialist humans, which specialists would call “true rhyme” “exact rhyme”, “perfect rhyme” etc. Meme rhymes with beam, seem. Gene rhymes with mean, spleen.

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Posted: 24 October 2019 07:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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OP Tipping - 24 October 2019 04:51 PM

Eyehawk - 24 October 2019 08:18 AM
I guess I’m lost. “Rhyme” means to sound alike. They can be spelled differently. Are we talking about some other comparison?

We are talking about “rhyme” as used by non-specialist humans, which specialists would call “true rhyme” “exact rhyme”, “perfect rhyme” etc. Meme rhymes with beam, seem. Gene rhymes with mean, spleen.

Coillins defines a Perfect Rhyme as “rhyme in which the stressed vowels and following consonants of the rhyming words correspond, but preceding consonants do not (Ex.: make, take)”

homophonic rhymes like reign and rain, bough and bow, pair and pear are not as plentiful but are “truly” perfect as to initial consonants and vowels. Are they sui generis?

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Posted: 24 October 2019 07:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Oecolampadius - 24 October 2019 07:08 PM

OP Tipping - 24 October 2019 04:51 PM
Eyehawk - 24 October 2019 08:18 AM
I guess I’m lost. “Rhyme” means to sound alike. They can be spelled differently. Are we talking about some other comparison?

We are talking about “rhyme” as used by non-specialist humans, which specialists would call “true rhyme” “exact rhyme”, “perfect rhyme” etc. Meme rhymes with beam, seem. Gene rhymes with mean, spleen.

Coillins defines a Perfect Rhyme as “rhyme in which the stressed vowels and following consonants of the rhyming words correspond, but preceding consonants do not (Ex.: make, take)”

homophonic rhymes like reign and rain, bough and bow, pair and pear are not as plentiful but are “truly” perfect as to initial consonants and vowels. Are they sui generis?

Those are not rhymes. Those are homophones.

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Posted: 25 October 2019 05:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Rhyming the same vowels before -m or -n is, in song-writing, pretty standard practice. The ear doesn’t seem to object to the imperfect rhyme as much as the eye reading the letters on a page (the /m/ and /n/ are both liquid, nasal sounds).

It can work with -t and -k endings as well, such as ‘sight’ and ‘like’. Often, as long as the consonants are of the same category (here -t and-k are both stops, one further back in the mouth than the other), song listeners seem more willing to forgive.

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Posted: 25 October 2019 10:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I’m not sure what you mean by ‘standard’. You’ll find examples, but I’d probably argue that they’re all the product of illiterate dribblers. Even if they have a Nobel prize in the bag.

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