Scots and spelling
Posted: 13 January 2020 09:09 PM   [ Ignore ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4220
Joined  2007-02-27

Scots is a Germanic language. Or possibly a dialect of English. It is spoken by about a hundred thousand people in Scotland. Or possibly over a million.
The boundary between English and Scots is blurry, as a lot of people code-switch, or speak in a form that combines Scots and “English English”.

They say a language is a dialect with an army and navy, so watch this space for further updates. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proposed_second_Scottish_independence_referendum)

Here’s a snippet of Matthew 1, in Scots:

This is the storie o the birth o Jesus Christ. His mither Mary wis trystit til Joseph, but afore they war mairriet she wis fund tae be wi bairn bi the Halie Spírit.

Those who speak Scots commonly use standard English spelling for the most part. Someone in Aberdeen will say [tø ðə rəitər], someone from South London will say [tuː və ɹɒɪʔə], but they’ll both write “to the writer”.

Lately however there appears to be a tendency, or even movement, for Scottish people to use a bit of Scots spelling, or spelling indicative of Scots pronunciations, on social media.

Some examples from the wild:

@cannyswim 22/06/2015

Ye ever wanty just wrap yersel up in tin foil nice and cosy and then just fucking get inty the microwave and then blow yersel up tae fuck

(Note that cannyswim means “can’t swim”. “Wanty” and “inty” aren’t traditional Scots spelling but are indicating “want tae” and “intae”.)

@paul_glancy 18/06/2019

Nae idea how folk can drink fizzy juice aw day. A had a litre bottle a Irn Bru earlier n ma teeth felt like they were wearing cardigans

("A" means “I”, again just an indication of pronunciation rather than traditional Scots spelling.)

@matthewlenniex 16/12/2016

I deh trust the dentist when they start talking in code about your teeth to their wee pal, you got suhin to say say it to ma face prick

In some Scots dialects, /θ/ is realised as [h].

@ryankingg

Just seen a bird shoutin at her bairn to put his pants on then pointed at me sayin ‘look the mans gonna steal ur willy’. Wtf no am no

“Am” = “I’m”. The second “no” means “not”.

@rinocolucci

Hate when sum1 follows you on insta n is private so U have to follow them n it turns out there in love wae horses and dae rapid shoutouts

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 January 2020 04:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1398
Joined  2007-03-01

Those who speak Scots commonly use standard English spelling for the most part. Someone in Aberdeen will say [tø ðə rəitər], someone from South London will say [tuː və ɹɒɪʔə], but they’ll both write “to the writer”.

I think that needs a bit of qualification. All through the 20th century there was a considerable movement for the rehabilitation and use of Scots as a legit language rather than the ‘dialect’ it had long been written off as, and much poetry and other forms of literature was written in Scots. My feeling is that when Scots think of what they’re writing as Scots, they spell it as such; but if they are in their own minds writing English, they spell it in English never mind how they might pronounce it in speech, just as English people do. I’m sure it wasn’t lost on you that your South Londoner doesn’t pronounce “to the writer” as written, either. (And nobody where I live would dream of writing something like ‘Cha’am Taahn All’ just because that’s the way they and everyone they know says it! They would write ‘Chatham Town Hall’, unless they were making a claim, in joke or in earnest, for Medway-ese to be a language in its own right. )

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 January 2020 04:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1481
Joined  2007-04-28

I still love the Rezillos whose singer was Fay Fife. Twenty years after their heyday I found out it was because she was ‘fae Fife’ or ‘from Fife’!
I found James Kelman and Irvine Welsh pretty much unreadable and had no interest in their use of Scots dialect and slang (as with Burns). However, I thoroughly enjoyed and can recommend Jeff Torrington’s Swing Hammer Swing! and, particularly, Alan Warner’s The Sopranos. The schoolgirls’ speech in the latter is fascinating and always intelligible. They turned it into an acclaimed play. It’s down to the writer and the plot.

Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ Evil fame      BL: bowl, Super Bowl ››