Verbing weirds language. 
Posted: 11 December 2007 07:20 AM   [ Ignore ]
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The classic Calvin & Hobbes strip from 1993.

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Posted: 17 September 2012 07:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Seems an appropriate place for this…

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Posted: 17 September 2012 10:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Dave Wilton - 11 December 2007 07:20 AM

The classic Calvin & Hobbes strip from 1993.

I’m getting the message “Site taken down.”

Ah, now I understand why. It’s a resurrected thread from 2007. I’m missing the point or relevance of your post, OP. Does it somehow connect to the strip Dave linked?

[ Edited: 17 September 2012 10:13 AM by aldiboronti ]
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Posted: 17 September 2012 10:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I think OP’s pic is meant to be relevant for its use of “medaling”.  Great pun.  But seriously, is “medaling” an example of verbing?  Is it not being used in this case as an adjective?

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Posted: 17 September 2012 11:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Yeah, it’s an adjective here, but it got there by way of being verbed.

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Posted: 17 September 2012 12:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks, dk, all mist now purged and dispersed.

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Posted: 17 September 2012 04:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Well, technically it’s a participle.

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Posted: 18 September 2012 12:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Old McKayla Jenkins is disappoint with these noun-modifier negotiations.

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Posted: 18 September 2012 12:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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BTW, is it true that all present participles in English are regular? How very odd.

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Posted: 18 September 2012 02:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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All present participles in English have an -ing ending, but they’re not all formed exactly the same way.

Some, like to want, add the ending directly to the infinitive form, wanting.

Some, like to take, drop letters from the infinitive before adding the ending, taking.

And some, like to hit, add letters, hitting.

There may be even more variation.

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Posted: 18 September 2012 03:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Further info:

It wasn’t always so, and there is dialectal variation that doesn’t use -ing.

The Old English participial ending was -ende. This eventually morphed into our present -ing, but during the Middle English period there was considerable variation: -ende, -inde, and(e), -ing(e). (Coincidentally, I lectured on this yesterday.)

The OED notes that you still find the -inde and -ande endings in Northern England and Scotland, but usually with the [d] muted, as in a singan burd (singing bird) or a gaan bairn (going child).

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Posted: 18 September 2012 04:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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All present participles in English have an -ing ending, but they’re not all formed exactly the same way.

Some, like to want, add the ending directly to the infinitive form, wanting.

Some, like to take, drop letters from the infinitive before adding the ending, taking.

And some, like to hit, add letters, hitting.

There may be even more variation.

Okay but to my mind the rules concerning these formations are straightforward: someone appraised of the rules should be able to determine the present participle for any given verb (or am I wrong?) so you could call it regular. So many verbs are irregular with regard to the past participle, for comparison.

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Posted: 18 September 2012 05:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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I’m pretty sure the same is true in Swedish - present participles are regular regardless of how irregular the rest of the verb conjugation is.

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Posted: 18 September 2012 08:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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The OED notes that you still find the -inde and -ande endings in Northern England and Scotland, but usually with the [d] muted, as in a singan burd (singing bird) or a gaan bairn (going child).

I’ve never heard of a “gaan bairn” in the North of England and never heard “gaan” used as an adjective, though I’ve heard the two words used separately as in “yon bairn’s gaan yam” (that child’s going home).  I’ve always assumed that “gaan” was the result of the -ing ending being smoothed out into -aan, because the north eastern dialect word for “go” is “ga(a)n”, “going” being “gannin” or “ga(a)n”, while in the north west (Cumbria) it’s “gah”, “going” being “gahn”.  The Afrikaans word for “go/going” is “gaan”.

(Gan canny, Steve G!)

[ Edited: 20 September 2012 05:45 AM by ElizaD ]
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