disconnect as a noun
Posted: 22 December 2007 07:29 PM   [ Ignore ]
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AHD4 has it from 1996 as a “lack of connection; a disparity: “There is a cosmic disconnect between what the voters want and what the party of the corporate interests can give them” (Bob Herbert, New York Times February 19, 1996).”

I’ll check NPA when I surface from my seasonal difficulties, but that year seems right to me as a time of origin.

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Posted: 23 December 2007 07:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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1983 N.Y. Times 17 June B6/5 There is a total, absolute disconnect between the Administration and the Congress as to what the armed forces are to do.

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Posted: 24 December 2007 04:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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OED has the noun form as a US origin from 1951 although I’d query their cite as a noun usage “They were not liable when local law enforcement agencies provided information upon which a disconnect order was based.” (New York Times) I’d define this as an adnoun or an adjective. And from 1958 which is more convincing “Now if someone would only invent a telephone that would sift out unwanted calls with a disconnect on the first ring. (Los Angeles Times)

Their second noun usage is the cite languagehat has above.

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Posted: 24 December 2007 10:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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flynn999, your earlier cites are not the meaning the poster is asking about.

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Posted: 25 December 2007 07:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I’ll disagree the the OED and say that the 1951 citation is not a noun, it’s a verb acting as a modifier. You could rewrite it as “an order to disconnect was based.”

The 1958 cite is a noun, but in a literal, not a metaphorical sense. The OED splits these senses.

[ Edited: 25 December 2007 12:20 PM by Dave Wilton ]
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Posted: 26 December 2007 07:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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A check through Google Books finds much earlier uses in the context of telephony:

“the ‘A’ operator must be signaled when each subscribers removes his receiver, and these signals must reappear as a disconnect as soon as the receivers are replaced”

from ‘Telephony:  A Manual of Design, Construction, and and Operation of Telephone Exchanges’ by Arthur Vaughn Abbott, v. 6 p. 154, published in 1905.

There are other similar books on telephony or electrical engineering, with “disconnect” used in the sense of “disconnection” in a circuit.

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