nertz
Posted: 28 January 2008 02:09 PM   [ Ignore ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3149
Joined  2007-02-26

"Cheer up, smile, nertz,” sang Eddie Cantor.

Does nertz actually mean anything?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 January 2008 02:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2861
Joined  2007-01-31

It’s a jocular mispronunciation of “nuts”.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 January 2008 12:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3149
Joined  2007-02-26

Obviously Eddie was too subtle for me. :-) Ta.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 January 2008 01:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2032
Joined  2007-02-19

A harmless tranvestite from Herts
Forsook trousers in favour of skirts,
Till one very cold day
He felt with dismay
That the frost had got into his nerts.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 31 January 2008 10:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22

Unfortunately, Lionello, you have fallen foul of Idiosyncratic British Pronunciation.  “Herts” is pronounced “harts”.  Another limerick on the subject:

There was a young man of Salisbury,
Whose mannners were quite halisbury-scalisbury.
He ran about Hampshire,
Without any pampshire,
‘Till the vicar compelled him to walisbury.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 01 February 2008 01:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2032
Joined  2007-02-19

I think, Bayard, that you and I may simply have acquired our respective habits of pronunciation in different social milieux. In the lowly non-U circles in which I moved, when in the U.K., “Herts” was frequently pronounced in such a way as to allow my doggerel to rhyme. I remember very clearly (my memory is selectively scabrous, or perhaps scabrously selective) a supposedly comic fictitious address which amused semi-literates like myself. It began “Miss Tilly Likes”...... and ended “......Tillit, Herts.” And remember, the Cockney rhyming slang abbreviation for “Berkshire Hunt” is “Berk” --- normally, I think, pronounced “Burk”, not “Bark”.

Thank you for the amusing (and instructive) limerick. I had no idea “Salisbury” was to be pronounced “Sarum”, and have never heard it pronounced that way. I thought “Sarum” was just an archaic name for the place.

There was a young lady of Tottenham,
Whose manners she quite had forgottenham.
At tea at the vicar’s
She pulled off her knickers,
Because she felt awfully hottenham.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 01 February 2008 04:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1297
Joined  2007-03-21
lionello - 01 February 2008 01:45 PM


There was a young lady of Tottenham,
Whose manners she quite had forgottenham.
At tea at the vicar’s
She pulled off her knickers,
Because she felt awfully hottenham.

I hope you are collecting these in some form.  I do love the rhymes of vicar’s and knickers that oft appears in your limericks.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 February 2008 01:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  469
Joined  2007-10-20

Thanks, Lionello, for clearing up the Salisbury rhyme. The main use of Salisbury in this country is as a type of steak, otherwise known as hamburger and pronounced as written. I’m assuming the term derives from the carnage the Anglo Saxons inflicted on each other on the Salisbury Plane, turning each other into said meat. 

(From Mad Magazine, years ago)

To the tune of Downtown, “with apologies to Petula Clark”.

When you eat meat
But hate the meat that you’re eating,
Then you’ve surely got . . .
Ground Round

It’s so unnerving
When they’re constantly serving
In your favorite spot . . .
Ground Round

It could be called a chopped steak,
Salisbury or beef patty
No matter what it’s called
It’s always overcooked and fatty

What can you do?

Go up to your waiter there
Loudly pound on your table
Stand up on your chair, and shout

Ground Round! Always you’re giving me
Ground Round! Always you’re feeding me
Ground Round! Why must it always be
Ground Round . . .
Ground Round . . .
Ground Round . . .
Ground Round . . .

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 February 2008 05:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  821
Joined  2007-06-20
Iron Pyrite - 02 February 2008 01:18 AM

The main use of Salisbury in this country is as a type of steak, otherwise known as hamburger and pronounced as written ...

It could be called a chopped steak,
Salisbury or beef patty
No matter what it’s called
It’s always overcooked and fatty

But presumably with four syllables, sall’is’bur’y, judging by the scansion needed in that verse ... the English city is pronounced closer to two syllables in Rightpondia, sorls’bree (sorry, can’t do the IPA ...)

The infamous hunt after which berks are named, incidentally, was the Berkeley Hunt, not the Berkshire Hunt, and the first syllable’s pronunciation as in “jerk” was probably because it comes from an aristocratic surname which preserved an older pronunciation. I quote from the Victoria County History of Middlesex, published 1911:

The only pack of foxhounds to which Middlesex can lay claim is the original Old Berkeley Hunt, which ceased to hunt the county more than half a century ago and is now divided into the Old Berkeley East and the Old Berkeley West, whose kennels are at Chorleywood in Hertfordshire and at Hazelmere Park, High Wycombe, respectively.

The original Old Berkeley Hunt was formed by Frederick Augustus, fifth Lord Berkeley, who adopted orange yellow or ‘tawny’ coats for it in commemoration of the fact-stated by Smith in his MS. history of the Berkeley family-that ‘a former Lord Berkeley’ kept thirty huntsmen in ‘tawny coats’ and his hounds at the village of Charing, now Charing Cross in the centre of London, and hunted in the vicinity.

The hunt’s commemoration in rhyming slang is because its “meets” were popular days out, not just for aristocratic hunting types but Cockneys too - the VCH says:

As time went on the Old Berkeley were obliged, Brooksby tells us, to abstain from advertising their meets “in order to avoid the pressure of a swarm of nondescripts who, starting from every suburb in London, were glad to make a meet of foxhounds their excuse for a holiday on hackney or wagonette, overwhelming the whole procedure by their presence and irritating farmers and landowners, to the great injury of the hunt.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 February 2008 10:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2861
Joined  2007-01-31

Actually, the standard US pronunciation is three syllables; the “salis” is slurred to “sals”.  For the Mad verse you either have to force the pronunciation to the spelling or accept an imperfect scansion.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 02 February 2008 10:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  710
Joined  2007-02-07
Iron Pyrite - 02 February 2008 01:18 AM

I’m assuming the term derives from the carnage the Anglo Saxons inflicted on each other on the Salisbury Plane, turning each other into said meat. 

The Oracle at Wiki delivers:

According to the Oxford English Dictionary (Second Edition), Salisbury steak was invented by an American physician, Dr. J. H. Salisbury (1823-1905) and named after him. The OED gives an 1897 citation. H. L. Mencken reported (in 1945) that the name was used to replace “hamburger steak” during World War I as a political euphemism.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 February 2008 06:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1195
Joined  2007-02-14

FWIW, I’ve always seen salisbury steak to be rather more coherent than hamburger.  More beaten into submission than ground to a pulp.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 February 2008 01:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22
lionello - 01 February 2008 01:45 PM

Thank you for the amusing (and instructive) limerick. I had no idea “Salisbury” was to be pronounced “Sarum”, and have never heard it pronounced that way. I thought “Sarum” was just an archaic name for the place.

I think it’s the bishop of Salisbury who is called “Sarum” (whereas the bishop of Bath and Wells is called “Bath and Wells")

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 February 2008 03:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2861
Joined  2007-01-31

The OED describes it as an ecclesiastical name for Salisbury, but does not restrict it to the bishop, and the citations show a wide variety of use.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 February 2008 03:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1297
Joined  2007-03-21

I saw an “original copy” (oh, what is the word for that kind of construction; I’m getting old.  I’ll think of it as soon as I hit send) of the Magna Carta in the chapter house there.

And I agree with the good Doctor.  The pronunciation of Salisbury whether cathedral or steak in leftpondia is sahlsbÉ™ree.  I thought of putting “bury” as the last two syllables, but that’s not right.  Where rightpondians might have just “bree” (as in brie cheese), we have a hint of a schwa in there (’cause we just can’t help it).

[ Edited: 03 February 2008 03:32 PM by Oecolampadius ]
Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ Miltonic neologisms      From the rooftops ››