Pregnant Question
Posted: 13 February 2008 02:46 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello.
This is my first time post and the reason I signed up for a user name. I am hoping someone here can help me. I am interested in the connection between a couple spanish and englishwords.

“Question” in spanish is “Pregunta”

“Pregnant” in spanish is Embarassada(sp?)

which would just lead me back to “Embarrassed” in english.

I can make a leap from pregnant to embarrassed which could mean impeading.

Is their a connection of “Preg” linking “Question” to “Pregnant”?

-X

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Posted: 13 February 2008 04:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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No. Spanish preguntar ‘to ask’ is from Latin precontor (precontari) ‘to ask a question’; English pregnant is from Latin (via French) praegnans (-ntis, variant praegnas, -atis) ‘pregnant’. The other pregnant, used in with argument, is from a different Latin word, premo (premere) ‘to press, squeeze’.

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Posted: 13 February 2008 09:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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embarazado in Spanish is formed

embarazado, da.
(Del part. de embarazar).
1. adj. Dicho de una mujer: preñada. U. t. c. s. f.

embarazar.
(Del port. o leon. embaraçar, der. de baraça, lazo, quizá voz de or. celta; cf. irl. ant. barr, copete).
1. tr. Impedir, estorbar, retardar algo.
2. tr. Dejar encinta a una mujer.
3. prnl. Dicho de una mujer: Quedarse embarazada.
4. prnl. Quedar impedido con cualquier embarazo.

or as babelfish would have it (badly)....

embarrassed, it gives.
(Of part. to embarrass).
1. adj. Said of a woman: pregnant. Or t. c. s. f.

to embarrass. (Of port. or lion to embaraçar, der. of baraça, bow, perhaps voice of or. celta; cf. irl. ant. barr, copete).
1. tr. To prevent, to hinder, to slow down something.
2. tr. To leave pregnant a woman.
3. prnl. Said of a woman: To remain pregnant.
4. prnl. To be crippled with any pregnancy.

Notice the synonym preñada is also given which compares to English prenatal.
Notice also that the most common English meaning of embarrass (cause self-concious distress) is not present.

[ Edited: 13 February 2008 09:13 AM by Myridon ]
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Posted: 13 February 2008 09:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Notice the synonym preñada is also given which compares to English prenatal.

I don’t know what you mean by that.  Preñada is the past participle of preñar, which is from Latin praegnare ‘to make pregnant,’ from whose present participle we get pregnant.  It’s true that the natal part of prenatal is ultimately from the same root as praegnare, but that seems like going around Robin Hood’s barn.

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Posted: 14 February 2008 08:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Hello, xiannc. Since no one else seems to have time to welcome you to this site, let me have the pleasure of doing so. As you can see, this is a contentious crowd --- your question has already got several people arguing with each other about the answer to it. That’s one of the things that make this site an interesting place to hang out.

As you have by now doubtless realized, there is not necessarily any connection between two like-sounding words in two different languages (or both in the same language, for that matter). There may be a connection, but again, they may have two quite different origins and/or meanings. You will encounter this statement repeated fairly frequently on thls forum, if you stick around --- lots of people ask questions like yours.

(edited to improve spelling)

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Posted: 14 February 2008 12:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I welcome you too, and lionello speaks truth!

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Posted: 14 February 2008 05:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Bablefish!  Horsefeathers!

Me imagino que has sacado el original del Diccionario de la RAE—I guess you quoted the original from the Dictionary of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language (DRAE).

Let’s have a look:

(Del port. o leon. embaraçar, der. de baraça, lazo, quizá voz de or. celta; cf. irl. ant. barr, copete).

From the Portuguese or Leonese (León is a province that has it’s own dialect, or language-depending on which side of the polemical fence you choose) embaraçar, from baraça, knot or lasso, perhaps of Celtic origin…

Let’s go back to the basic definition, which shows “embarazada” to be synonymous with “preñada”:

embarazado, da.

(Del part. de embarazar). (From the participle of embarazar)

1. adj. Dicho de una mujer: preñada. U. t. c. s. f. (Said of a pregnant woman.  UTCSF= Also used as a feminine substantive.)

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

Diccionario de la lengua española © 2005 Espasa-Calpe S.A., Madrid:
embarazado, da

1. adj. Molesto, incómodo:
ante tu pregunta se mostró embarazado.
2. [Mujer] preñada. También f.:
las embarazadas deben cuidar su dieta.

Note that this definition of embarazado/a overlaps with the English sense of embarrassed:
1. adj. Bothered, uncomfortable.  He showed embarrassment in the face of your question.

Welcome to the funhouse, X.

[ Edited: 14 February 2008 05:29 PM by cuchuflete ]
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Posted: 15 February 2008 12:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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embaraçar, from baraça, knot or lasso, perhaps of Celtic origin…

But the OED gives the root of “embarrass” as the Romance word barre, “a bar”, i.e. “something that hampers or impedes”; which - given that the cognate word crops up in English, French (embarrasser) and Italian (imbarrazzare) - seems a whole lot more likely than an obscure Portuguese or Leonese dialect word.

I’ve always assumed that the sense “pregnant” in Spanish arises from the sense that a woman is encumbered or weighed down by pregnancy, rather than any idea of bashfulness.

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Posted: 15 February 2008 05:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Syntinen Laulu - 15 February 2008 12:07 AM

embaraçar, from baraça, knot or lasso, perhaps of Celtic origin…

But the OED gives the root of “embarrass” as the Romance word barre, “a bar”, i.e. “something that hampers or impedes”; which - given that the cognate word crops up in English, French (embarrasser) and Italian (imbarrazzare) - seems a whole lot more likely than an obscure Portuguese or Leonese dialect word.

I’ve always assumed that the sense “pregnant” in Spanish arises from the sense that a woman is encumbered or weighed down by pregnancy, rather than any idea of bashfulness.

You are arguing that the English etymology somehow invalidates the Spanish etymology of a different word?

Nobody has argued that the EN word came from “an obscure Portuguese or Leonese dialect word”.  Those are the sources the RAE
gives for the Spanish word.  That has nothing to do with the English etymology.

The Compact OED gives this, which really does link the two distinct etymologies:

— ORIGIN French embarrasser, probably from Portuguese embaraçar, from baraço ‘halter’.

Portuguese and Leonés may be “obscure” to the average EN speaker, but that certainly doesn’t make them any less valid as sources.

[ Edited: 15 February 2008 05:54 AM by cuchuflete ]
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