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“expert” as used by the current US media
Posted: 04 March 2007 06:57 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I have this unpleasant feeling that I have asked this before. What is an “expert” as used in the current US media?  Here is is an example, a quote with my emphasis, from today’s Washingtonpost.com

...marriage has almost become a luxury item, one that only the well educated and well paid are interested in,” said Isabel V. Sawhill, an expert on marriage and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

ed-spelling

[ Edited: 04 March 2007 07:10 AM by janeskid ]
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Posted: 04 March 2007 07:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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There is no formal qualification test. Typically, “experts” quoted in the media have published at least one book on the subject or are university professors or researchers at institutions like Brookings who study the subject.

In some cases, “expert” is a very generous term.

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Posted: 04 March 2007 08:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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There is, of course, the well-known defintion of an “expert” - from “ex”, former or has-been and “spurt”, drip under pressure....

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Posted: 04 March 2007 08:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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There are experts and there are experts.  But, today, Daniel Webster’s words are as valid as they were in his day:

“The world is governed more by appearance than realities so that it is fully as necessary to seem to know something as to know it.”

Daniel Webster (1782 - 1852) US diplomat, lawyer, orator, & politician; Whig presidential candidate 1836; Secretary of State 1841-1843; Secretary of State 1850-1852

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Posted: 04 March 2007 08:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Whilst working for the Civil Service, I used to think that its motto should be the reverse of North Carolina’s - “Videre quam esse”, instead of “Esse quam videre” ("to seem, rather than to be” instead of “to be rather than to seem").

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Posted: 04 March 2007 10:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I should think that the meaning of “expert” is, in the context of the us media, (or any other media for that matter), and specifically the specific entity within that realm (i.e., the washington post in this case), that which is expedient to conveying the preferred sense that furthers that media outlet’s espoused agenda.  One must read between the lines.

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Posted: 04 March 2007 10:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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“One must read between the lines.”

Should that not have read, ‘one must lead between the lines?’ ;-)

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Posted: 04 March 2007 11:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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skibs- depends on what is meant by “lead”.

I think the media would like to “lead” by what’s implicit in “the lines”.

I think it is incumbent upon the reader to try to discern (and therefore “read between the lines") what the writer is endeavoring to “lead” to reader to believe.

I’d say (based on my estimation of what is perhaps) your point is strikingly accurate and relevant.

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Posted: 05 March 2007 05:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Two points: first, the motto of North Carolina is actually esse quam videri. Second, it doesn’t mean ‘to be rather than to seem’, although whoever chose it thought that it did. It comes from Cicero: ‘Virtute enim ipsa non tam multi praediti esse quam videri volunt,’ which means: ‘Not as many people want to be endowed with true bravery as want to seem to be endowed with it.’ The three words alone do not convey the intended message.

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Posted: 05 March 2007 09:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Sorry about the spelling error - a common one, if Google is anything to go by.  Leaving Cicero aside, what meaning do the three words “esse quam videri” convey on their own?

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Posted: 05 March 2007 09:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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what meaning do the three words “esse quam videri” convey on their own?

to-be, rather-than, to-seem

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Posted: 05 March 2007 10:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I am not seeing the problem with the motto.

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Posted: 05 March 2007 10:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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I am not seeing the problem with the motto.

Neither had I. Perhaps Kurwamac will explain what’s grammatical wrong it.

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Posted: 05 March 2007 01:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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There’s no finite verb.

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Posted: 05 March 2007 01:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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No Latin scholar, I, so I ask: I can see how that would prevent it from being a complete sentence, but does it really cancel its apparent meaning?  In English, “to be or not to be” isn’t a grammatical sentence, but it has meaning.

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Posted: 05 March 2007 02:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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There’s no finite verb.

I stand corrected. What is the finite verb in per ardua ad astra or cum grano salis?

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