2 of 3
2
Bot boi
Posted: 06 August 2008 10:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  114
Joined  2008-04-24

AFAIK, suet pastry is always steamed or boiled, whereas shortcrust or flaky pastry is baked.  Or can you bake suet pastry?  Someone tell me please if you can.  Or what about a suet pudding pie - boiled suet dumplings inside a flaky pastry crust put in the oven to bake?  You could serve it with either custard or gravy, depending on which course you wanted it to become.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 August 2008 01:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  362
Joined  2007-03-05

Yeah, you can bake it too. Suet’s only fat.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 August 2008 07:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  114
Joined  2008-04-24

And just to prove it, here‘s a handy recipe for bacon roll with suet pasty, either baked or boiled.  To add to zirbelnuss’s collection of delicious things to do with suet.

Bacon Roll - Baked

Make roll in same way as above, but instead of wrapping in foil, place on greased baking tray with the join underneath. Brush all over with beaten egg or milk.
Bake near top of moderately hot oven, gas 6, 400F or 200C for 30 to 40 minutes, when it will be crusty and golden.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 August 2008 02:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
Rank
Total Posts:  26
Joined  2007-07-16

Myridon: there is a recipe in the Joy of Cooking for steamed fruit suet pudding. It mentions half a pound of beef suet, but doesn’t tell you where to get it. Yahoo Answers recommends not to use birdfeed suet, because it’s probably quite old and certainly pumped full of preservatives. It’s possible that a UK food supplier might have it. British Goods Online seem to have the Atora brand.
I suppose one could dump some birdseed, if that’s your taste, in guards pudding, and it might get lost among the raspberry pips.

Margaret

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 August 2008 04:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1231
Joined  2007-04-28

Mulligan Stew seems to be an American dish popular with hobos in which everything available is bunged in. No pastry though, obviously.

My mother always used Atora suet, Zirbelnuss. I think you only acquire a taste for delicacies involving it if you were brought up eating it!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 August 2008 08:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
RankRank
Total Posts:  93
Joined  2008-05-07

I have some modern British recipes that substitute butter (and use less of it) for the suet, suggesting that even there its use may be in decline.

And one can substitute lard, though it must be good lard, and one must be willing to withstand the brickbats of traditionalists.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 August 2008 10:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1231
Joined  2007-04-28

When I was a small child British fridges all contained a dripping bowl ie previously used lard poured in it, and it would separate into layers and only the bottom one containing bits of burnt bacon etc was ever discarded. This was before cholesterol. A popular snack was the dripping sandwich (lard or dripping smeared on bread) though I suspect my parents gentrified themselves out of these because they never forced one on me.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 August 2008 12:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  362
Joined  2007-03-05

We had one at home, though I was never allowed to eat dripping sandwiches (probably because my cousin - three years older - who did, was frighteningly obese). I have heard, though not been offered, of lard/dripping and brown sugar sandwiches.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 August 2008 12:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  114
Joined  2008-04-24

North of England standard tea-time fare for us was often either bread-and-milk-with-sugar or bread-and-dripping-with-salt-and-pepper.  Sadly for them, by the time my children arrived public health concern had weaned everyone away from such delicacies.

This thread made me wonder if suet, lard, dripping and fat are all from Old English words and I learned:

Suet is an Anglo-French word.

Lard is Old French:

L. lrdum, lridum, usually believed to be cogn. w. Gr. * fat, - pleasant to the taste

Dripping is from Old English or possibly, due to lack of citations in an interim period, from Norse. 

Fat is also from Old English.  Reading further down the page, I came across this on “fat lot”, “fat chance”:

c. a fat lot: a large amount, a great deal: always ironical and implying ‘very little, hardly anything’. Similarly a fat chance, implying ‘hardly any opportunity (or possibility)’; also (N.Z.) a fat show.

1892 I. ZANGWILL Childr. Ghetto (1893) I. ii. 24 ‘I von’t sell you no more tickets,’ said Sugarman… ‘A fat lot I care,’ said Becky, tossing her curls.

I’d have thought it was earlier, but there it is.

Edit:  On a roll (very silly pun intended), I also found butter:

OE. butere wk. fem. (in compounds buttor-); ad. L. butyrum, ad. Gr. * So OFris. butera, botera, MDu. bter(e, botre, Du. boter, MLG. botter, late OHG. (10th or 11th c.) butera, MHG., mod.G. butter, all from Latin.
The Gr. is usually supposed to be f.  ox or cow + cheese, but is perhaps of Scythian or other barbarous origin

(I hope no Scythians are reading this);

and margarine:

[< French margarine MARGARIN n. (an application arising from a misconception about the chemical nature of the substance).


The substance was so called on account of its having the appearance of mother-of-pearl.

Margarin is related to margarite, Anglo-Norman for pearl, daisy. So there you are. 

*Greek characters omitted due to laziness.  Which harks back to a deprived childhood.

[ Edited: 08 August 2008 01:38 PM by astal ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 August 2008 02:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1297
Joined  2007-03-21

This seems to contain what are elsewhere known as slippery dumplings.

This is not on-topic, I know, but I just think that nothing edible should be modified by the adjective “slippery.” Except maybe White Castle Hamburgers.

edit: I posted my note before reading astal’s marvelous contribution.  Dripping is another one of those adjectives, though not as bad as “slippery.”

[ Edited: 08 August 2008 02:26 PM by Oecolampadius ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 August 2008 07:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
RankRank
Total Posts:  93
Joined  2008-05-07

Lard spread on bread, sometimes with minced garlic, is a popular snack in Austria Heurigen, (more or less) rustic taverns selling this year’s (=heuer) wine. I’ve also had fat from a pork roast, with the cracklings.

It’s a VERY occasional treat (perhaps once a decade).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 August 2008 06:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  590
Joined  2007-02-22

I remember having beef dripping once, as a child, and it being literally the juices that had dripped from the roast beef.  I had it hot, on bread and it was very tasty AFAIR, but we very rarely had beef and then my mother always wanted the dripping to make gravy with if we did.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 August 2008 07:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  311
Joined  2007-02-17
venomousbede - 08 August 2008 10:17 AM

When I was a small child British fridges all contained a dripping bowl ie previously used lard poured in it,…

I do have a bowl of bacon grease in the freezer to be used in small amounts as a flavoring - not for sandwiches.  Lard can be bought from the Mexican food section of the store and is labelled manteca rather than lard.  I’m sure that I have eaten some manteca in prepared foods and restaurants, but I have never used it myself.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 August 2008 11:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2344
Joined  2007-01-30

As a child in the 50s dripping sandwiches were among my favourite snacks. As in other posts above, beef dripping from various meals was stored in the larder (fridges were still an undreamed of luxury in many British households of the time; the first time we had one was in married quarters in Aden in 1956.)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 August 2008 01:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3537
Joined  2007-01-29

is labelled manteca rather than lard

Everywhere in the Spanish-speaking world manteca means ‘lard’… except in Argentina (where I learned my Spanish), where it is the normal word for ‘butter.’ Just one of the ways in which Argentines are weird from everybody else’s point of view.

Profile
 
 
   
2 of 3
2
 
‹‹ Dog tags      CamelCaps ››