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Posted: 08 August 2008 05:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Former lurker, now an infrequent poster and frequent reader of these fine pages.  Retired antiquarian bookman; retired painter/handyman for a slumlord; retired postal worker; retired university prof. of Spanish literature; retired corporate executive (of a minor sort) who did product development, marketing, acquisitions, sales training and such in and around logistics (transportation and warehousing) software--mostly for what was then called the IBM AS/400.  Currently a daylily hybridizer, very small scale organic farmer, and 26.48 hours per day member and moderator of a language forum.  More cryptic personal details there: http://forum.wordreference.com/member.php?u=887. Given my visibility at that other board, I have to keep most personal details to myself. Banned members can be vindictive.  I live in a tiny hamlet in coastal Maine, U.S., after not putting down roots in a dozen U.S. states and countries throughout South America and southern Europe.

Devoted to my sons, and then, in no particular order, to words, daylilies, languages, jazz, chamber music, wandering aimlessly, and most recently the works of Terry Pratchett. 

Warm thanks to Mr. Wilton and all of you for creating and nourishing this place.
Cuchuflete*

*The name is purloined from something I read decades ago in a collection of short stories by Julio Cortázar.  The Spanish word carries a sense of
“Prankster”.

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Posted: 08 August 2008 06:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I’m posting this separately only because I’m closing in on the 500 mark and I’d like that to be sooner rather than later so I can get my 4th box.

On the Wiltons.  Jim is a lawyer and a Buddhist and Dave is a stone cold atheist.  Their brother, Carl, on the other hand is one of the best preachers in the US in my humble opinion.  Carlos was on a connection, that I think predates the public easy-access internet, now called ecunet.org.  So was I.  We used to have to dial into a server in Colorado to connect to our ecumenical discussions in the 80s. I “knew” him before I knew Dave and Jim.

I’m embarrassed to say how many times I’ve cribbed ideas from Carl.

[ Edited: 08 August 2008 06:41 PM by Oecolampadius ]
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Posted: 08 August 2008 09:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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In no particular order - ex-hippie, ex-potter, ex-glassblower, ex-ambulance attendant, ex-welder, ex-convict, ex-bodybuilder, ex-abalone diver, ex-world traveler, ex-medical student, ex-hot rodder, ex-recording engineer. I still dabble in all of them with the exception of ambulances and felonies.

Avid reader, overclocker, internet marketer, music collector, art gallery crawler, net explorer, pool player, denizen of dive bars and tequila aficionado. I play drums in a garage band of old farts who may all have gray hair but still know how to rock. We do cover band gigs a couple of times a month.

Currently working in technical sales specializing in electronic products for an automation components distributor. I’m also the company “computer guy” and run a side business in computer repair and building custom computer systems.

Stumbled in here one day and never left. 

I miss Vivien.

People who say age is a state of mind don’t workout.

edit: typos

[ Edited: 08 August 2008 09:36 PM by happydog ]
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Posted: 09 August 2008 05:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Dave Wilton, owner of Judith Bennett’s Ale, Beer and Brewsters in England, women’s work in a changing world 1300-1600. (An excellent book, btw, from which I have nicked, I mean quoted extensively).

Another familial connection. Judith is a cousin.

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Posted: 09 August 2008 06:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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An impressive fistful of quondams, happydog!  I thought I’d led a colourful life, I feel positively Pooterish in comparison. Good to see another ex-hippy here (I thought our generation weren’t supposed to get old. What happened?)

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Posted: 10 August 2008 03:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Last time we did this, I could say I was pushing 50. By now 50 is pushing me…

My alias refers to the fact that although I live in the Netherlands, my parents are Frisian. So I like to think that I’m Frisian first, but I’m Dutch too. Moreover I always thought it’s a nice reflection of my status here as a none native speaker.

My authority here is mainly based on my ability to quote from the online Woordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (WNT) and my copies of the Etymologisch Woordenboek van het Nederlands (EWN) and Van Dale. For the rest I’m just an interested layman.

My professional involvement with words and language is my job as a technical writer. As an extension of that, I make instruction videos.

Other interests are vintage aircraft, non-mainstream movies, music and sci-fi.

Since this thread (unintentionally I suppose) turned into a sort of confessional, I’m willing to confess that I like to refer to myself as a ‘convinced atheist’. That doesn’t mean I don’t like to discuss religious issues with anyone, on the contrary, I’d say. I think they are great intellectual exercises. It’s a real pity that such discussions always end in tragedy here.

Let me take this opportunity to thank you for your patience with me. I know my English is in now way at a level it can compare to yours. At times I feel really clumsy, but I’m really grateful no one has ever made a remark about it.

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Posted: 10 August 2008 06:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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While my number of posts may label me a newbie, I’ve actually been on here for some time, taking breaks as life demands.

Male, 64 this year, raised Southern Baptist in Northern Virginia, so kinda a thinking man’s Baptist.  No religion since I was 18.  Never handled snakes or talked in tongues.  Love me some beer.  Had a Sierra Nevada in the late 1970s, and never looked back.  Have a BS in organic chemistry, taught high school for three years, and have been a professional numismatist for 37 years. 

I’ve always been inquisitive about “things” since my early years.  Read my dad’s copy of the Lincoln Library of Essential Information (one volume tome) from cover to cover when I was 12.  Got an almanac every year for Christmas.  Better than a pony. 
Discovered the internet later than some(1998), found snopes.com to show a cow-orker that her email about deoderant causing her Lupus was probably not to be taken seriously.  Joined the brilliant folks over there for a year or so, learned a lot, then found the Straight Dope Message Board and settled in there.  Learned even more. 

Found myself driving to my local library every night to look up words in Dictionary of Americanism by Mathews.  Decided that buying one from a used book site might be a better use of my time.  Wow!  They were only $10 or so.  Then discovered that Jon Lighter had written a few useful volumes.  But, $50! in the bookstore was beyond my purse.  Found them for $10(in those days) as remainders on abebooks.  Changed my life. 

I’m just a dabbler.  Subscribe to newspaperarchive and it’s worth more than they charge(hope they aren’t listening).  Love the sport of competitive antedating.  My dream in life is to discover the “true” meaning of “33” on the back of the Rolling Rock beer bottles.  Since I live 2 hours from the Latrobe(PA) library, which houses microfilms of the local newspaper, I’ll have this one solved in no time.  :)

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Posted: 10 August 2008 06:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Sam: You’ve probably seen the Wikipedia article, but just in case, this is what they say:

The number 33 is printed prominently on all bottles of Rolling Rock. A widely-held belief is that it marks the repeal of prohibition in 1933. However, according to James L. Tito, former CEO of Latrobe Brewing, the “33” signifies the 33 words in the beer’s slogan: “Rolling Rock - From the glass lined tanks of Old Latrobe, we tender this premium beer for your enjoyment as a tribute to your good taste. It comes from the mountain springs to you.”

A founding executive is said to have written “33” at the end of the slogan to indicate the number of words it comprised as a guide for the bottle printers. However, they thought it was part of the text and incorporated it into the label graphics. Hence, the first batch of bottles carried the number “33” and they remained that way since they were continually collected and reused (also, during the Great Depression, there was no reason to throw away perfectly good merchandise and start over). This tradition has been sustained by the company as the wording on the labels has changed over the years, and the verbiage is carefully structured to retain a length of 33 words. There are several other lesser-known theories or urban legends about the “mysterious” number 33, but none have been verified.

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Posted: 10 August 2008 07:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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languagehat - 10 August 2008 06:54 AM

Sam: You’ve probably seen the Wikipedia article, but just in case, this is what they say:

Yep.  Pretty familiar with that.  Of course, that’s what Tito told Cecil in or about 1988.  And James L. Tito, the grandson of one of the original founders, is relying on an oral family tradition.  Hardly reliable, from a guy who was 2-years old when Rolling Rock was rolled out.  I’ll get it.  Just you wait.

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Posted: 10 August 2008 08:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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I’m just this guy.  My only claim to professional languagism is that one of my job responsibilities is proofreading technical writing.  I work for a small international software giant with headquarters in an upstate New York farm house.  I have a background in engineering technology and computer science so I can understand a little of what I am proofing.  I got my start as a word lover somewhen in the early grades of elementary school when I was the only person in the class (and I am inculding the teacher) who realized that a kookaburra was a bird and not, as the vocabulary at the end of the story suggested, a ‘laughing jackass’.  Born and raised in Chicago, IL, I have lived in Boston, MA (2 years), Flagstaff, AZ (7 years), Santa Ana, CA (1 year) and upstate New York (29 years).

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Posted: 10 August 2008 01:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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My only claim to professional languagism is that one of my job responsibilities is proofreading technical writing.

And that’s a damn good claim! (sez this former technical proofreader).

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Posted: 10 August 2008 07:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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One of a couple of token Australians who lurk and occasionally contribute. (OP Tipping being my compatriot) 43 yo male. Specialty is understanding the game of cricket and being able to explain the Leg Before Wicket law in that fine game.
Work in the Financial Planning industry in Melbourne. Can help explain other matters OZ, so long as they don’t particularly relate to word origins, for I am truly an enthusiastic onlooker and no more.

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Posted: 11 August 2008 03:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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languagehat - 10 August 2008 01:44 PM

My only claim to professional languagism is that one of my job responsibilities is proofreading technical writing.

And that’s a damn good claim! (sez this former technical proofreader).

I get stuff from lots of non-native English speakers, mostly Korean and Chinese and from native bilinguals whose English is not quite what we would call Standard, folks whose other language is either Hindi or Tamil.

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Posted: 11 August 2008 04:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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(Blushes becomingly; thanks for your kind words, people!)

I’m a 50-something woman of mixed Viennese Jewish and Somerset/Essex Quaker ancestry, brought up in Buckinghamshire and London and now resident in Kent (if the Medway towns can be said truly to be Kent and not a displaced bit of the East End, which is disputable).

I read British mediaeval archaeology at university and worked in the field for a while but now work in medical education and in social history research; specifically the history of British friendly and fraternal societies (that’s Oddfellows, Druids, Freemasons, Foresters, Free Gardeners, Loyal United Friends, Sons and Sisters of the Phoenix, Good Templars, Rechabites, etc.).

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Posted: 11 August 2008 05:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Oecolampadius - 08 August 2008 02:43 PM

For my part, a militant atheism is far better than a passive Christianity, which is what I deal with more days that I care to admit.

As it happens, I just watched _Jesus Christ:  Vampire Hunter_:  a gloriously campy, extremely low-budget indie film.  In one scene a group of people pull up and announce to Jesus “You don’t know us, because we have never spoken to you before.  We are atheists!” A very cheesy fight scene ensues, and after Jesus kicks the atheists’ butts he asks them “Real enough for you?”

Looking for good acting, good writing, good theology, good cinematography, or at least adequate sound quality?  This is absolutely not the film for you.  But if your reaction to the title is “Dude!  I have to see that!” then by all means rent it.  It is under an hour and a half, so what the heck?  Oh, and did I mention it has lots and lots of lesbians?

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