“grey” hound
Posted: 18 August 2008 08:05 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Wiki claims that “greyhound” is etymologically unrelated to grey/gray.  This boggles my mind.

What is a more authoritative source to check?  I don’t have realworld dictionaries anymore, much less etymological ones.

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Posted: 18 August 2008 08:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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moonbath - 18 August 2008 08:05 PM

Wiki claims that “greyhound” is etymologically unrelated to grey/gray.  This boggles my mind.

What is a more authoritative source to check?  I don’t have realworld dictionaries anymore, much less etymological ones.

Try etymonline.com

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Posted: 18 August 2008 08:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Scholarly opinion is divided on this point as I recall from my own inquiry some years ago. Some apparently-respectable scholars do think the “grey-” is basically, uh, “grey”.

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Posted: 18 August 2008 09:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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The OED2 says “it has no connexion with GREY a. or with GREW a., Greek, nor with grey = badger (GREY n.).”

But AHD says “Middle English grehound, from Old English grīghund : grīg, gray + hund, hound”.

You pays your money and you takes your pick.

[ Edited: 18 August 2008 09:04 PM by Dr. Techie ]
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Posted: 19 August 2008 12:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Greyhounds come in a variety of colours, however, I understand that the official terminology for the colour of the ones that are actually grey is ‘blue’.

(I think this is a touchstone by which the cognoscenti recognise one another, like red hunting jackets being ‘pink’ and white horses being ‘grey’.)

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Posted: 19 August 2008 07:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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blue = grey is also used in the cat world. Blue-point Siamese actually have grey points, for example.

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Posted: 19 August 2008 01:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Various breeds of pedigree black and white dogs are described as blue merle.  Yarn or cloth may be blue marle, which is blue and white.  Both merle and marle are from the same root as marbled.  Which is from a Greek word for “shining stone”.  FWIW.

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