Gyp
Posted: 30 August 2008 11:33 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Is the term gyp or gip meaning pain, as in “my shoulder is giving me gyp today,” related to gyp meaning to cheat?

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Posted: 31 August 2008 04:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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No connection apparently.

The verb gyp, meaning to trick, to swindle is, according to OED, “perhaps short for gypsy or for gippo.”

Gyp meaning pain comes from (and this surprised me) an “apparent contraction of gee-up used in dial. as noun.”

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Posted: 02 September 2008 01:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thanks for that, Aldi.

What’s the etymology of gee-up?  Is it equine?

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Posted: 02 September 2008 07:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Yes, it’s an expanded form of gee “A word of command to a horse, variously (in different localities) used to direct it to turn to the right, to go forward, or to move faster” (attested from 1628); gee-up is gee plus the interjection hup!, which was confused with up.

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